Sherlock Sam and the Ghostly Moans at Fort Canning Review

sherlock_sam_2Sherlock Sam and the Ghostly Moans in Fort Canning by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape

Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2016. 978-1449477882

Synopsis: On a class trip to Fort Canning, a base used by British troops during World War II, Sherlock Sam and his friends discover a hidden escape port that appears to be haunted. Desperate to prove that there is no such thing as a ghost, Sherlock, his robot Watson, his sister Wendy, Sherlock’s dad, and his friends Jimmy and Nazhar set out to discover the real source of the moaning within the historical monument.

Why I picked it up: I was eager to read more about Singapore’s Greatest Kid Detective!

Why I finished it: In Sherlock’s second case, he’s forced to confront the idea that something illogical could be the most logical solution. But Sherlock isn’t willing to accept that all signs point to the supernatural. Sure, there are plenty of ghosts in Peranakan and Asian culture, but those are just stories; stories like that couldn’t possibly be real. Then again, belief in the supernatural is different from person to person…. Readers get to know a little bit more about Sherlock’s dad, as he joins the gang to help his children and their classmates solve the mystery behind the ghostly moans coming from the hidden escape port. It’s easy to see where Sherlock gets some of his hobbies and quirks, evidenced in the plot and by the accompanying illustrations. I liked the additional character development because now the parents don’t feel like such flat characters. They do have a role, and it’s not just to cook food, tell them to do the dishes, and lecture them about getting to school on time. Husband-wife writing team Felicia Low-Jimenez and Adan Jimenez have started to develop a little bit more of their style with this book. The plot remains somewhat formulaic (as mysteries tend to be), but they throw in enough twists to keep the reader guessing and keep things from becoming predictable. They have even thrown in some universal cultural references to ground non-Asian readers in the story. drewscape’s drawings continue to enchant, focusing more on the little details in the background for this installment that not only brings the characters to life, but gives us a better idea of their personalities as well. It’s fun, humorous, and just the right amount of scary. And be sure to check out Sherlock Sam’s Blog and Facebook page for even more of the boy detective.

Other related materials: Sherlock Sam and the Missing Heirloom in Katong by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Sinister Letters in Bras Basah by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Alien Encounter on Pulau Ubin by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Vanishing Robot in Penang by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Cloaked Classmate in Macritchie by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Stolen Script in Balestier by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Fiendish Mastermind in Jurong by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Obento Bonanza in Tokyo by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Sherlock Sam and the Comic Book Caper in New York by A.J. Low, illustrations by drewscape; Waylon! One Awesome Thing by Sarah Pennypacker, pictures by Marla Frazee; Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective books by Donald J. Sobol; Nate the Great books by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, illustrated by Marc Simont; The Boxcar Children series by Gertrude Chandler Warner; The Chicken Squad books by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Kevin Cornell

 

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