The Vile Village Review

ASOUE_7The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 7) by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Bret Helquist

HarperCollins, 2001. 978-0064408653

Synopsis: With Mr. Poe running out of guardians, he decides to entrust the Baudelaire orphans to the V.F.D. (Village of Fowl Devotees) as part of the “It Takes a Village to Raise a Child” campaign. However, the village is not as keen to raise Violet, Klaus, and Sunny after they are accused of murdering Count Olaf (who is really Jacques Snicket) by the famous Detective Dupont (who is really Count Olaf in disguise). The children have also been finding mysterious couplets hinting that the Quagmire triplets are nearby, but with few clues to go on and the town coming after them, the orphans will have to work a miracle to find their friends and escape the village.

Why I picked it up: What’s the opposite of Schadenfreude?

Why I finished it: It becomes clear quickly that the V.F.D. has no real inkling of what the aphorism “It Takes a Village to Raise a Child” really means, making all the townspeople – with perhaps the exception of the caretaker Hector – seem brutish and impotent. Violet is quick to point out that having the village raise them does not entail that they do all of the townspeople’s chores, but this does little to deter the Council of Elders (a group of older citizens with crows decorating their hats) and make their situation any more tolerable. The villagers are also fans of the children being seen but not heard, which makes it difficult for the Baudelaires to prove they are innocent of murdering Jacques Snicket. The adults in the book are still predictably incompetent, but this again helps Violet, Klaus, and Sunny shine through with their wit and know-how. The Quagmire Triplets, although they do not make an appearance until the close of the book, are equally clever in their means of communicating their whereabouts to the Baudelaires. Snicket also takes a stab at slant journalism, though it doesn’t seem to add much depth to the story and merely serves to highlight the adult agenda. Fans of the series are sure to enjoy the continuation of this marvelously morbid series, though I am beginning to suspect that there is little hope the Baudelaire children will find any sort of respite.

Other related materials: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 3) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 4) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Austere Academy (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 5) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Hostile Hospital (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 8) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 9) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Penultimate Peril (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 12) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 13) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Beatrice Letters by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Brett Helquist; Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Lemony Snicket; All The Wrong Questions series by Lemony Snicket; The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Caron Ellis, music by Nathaniel Stookey; The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart, illustrated by Carson Ellis

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