Tag Archives: A Series of Unfortunate Events (series)

What’s On: A Series of Unfortunate Events, Season 2

series-of-unfortunate-events-s2A Series of Unfortunate Events, Season 2 starring Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Malina Weissman, Louis Hynes, Presley Smith, K. Todd Freeman, Usman Ally, Jacqueline Robbins, Joyce Robbins, Matty Cardaropole, John DeSantis, Sara Rue, and Lucy Rush

Netflix, 2018.

Synopsis: Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire continue to search for answers about the fire that killed their parents, an apparent survivor of the fire, and the mysterious organization V.F.D as they are pursued by Count Olaf and his acting troupe.

Season Two begins with the Baudelaire orphans waiting in the office of Prufrock Preparatory School to be seen by the vice principal. In fact, they have been waiting there so long, Klaus (Louis Hynes) notes, that Sunny (Presley Smith) is now a toddler rather than an infant. Nothing like a bit of light humor to start off a much darker series of events for both the Baudelaire children and the audience. What I appreciate about the series is that the characters are being moved around in such a way that we become invested in their fates – in the books, many of the people the Baudelaires encounter are simply around for the duration of the book and then drop off, never to be seen again. For example, the librarian at Prufrock (Sara Rue) is recruited by Jacques Snicket (Nathan Fillon) as a V.F.D. member and is seen in later episodes aiding Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. The audience is also more easily able to follow the journey of the notorious sugar bowl that was the catalyst for the events now occurring; it is seen repeatedly in the possession of a mystery female whom we are being lead to believe may be the survivor of the fire that killed the Baudelaire parents. The added musical numbers performed by Count Olaf and his troupe are delightfully amusing, especially given the rather dire and depressing nature of the series. And while this season ends on a literal cliffhanger (a fact that I am sure will not go unnoticed at the beginning of the next season), the audience is still somewhat prepared for further trouble to come, though we know not yet what forms it will take.

 

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The Carnivorous Carnival Review

ASOUE_9The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 9) by Lemony Snicket; Illustrations by Bret Helquist

HarperCollins, 2002. 978-0064410120

Synopsis: When Violet, Klaus, and Sunny find themselves at the Calgari Carnival and are forced to disguise themselves as freaks to hide from Count Olaf, the orphans feel like they have fallen even further into despair. Then Olaf announces that one of the freaks will be fed to a heard of hungry lions in order to increase ticket sales.

Why I picked it up: I’m invested….

Why I finished it: As promised, the situation for the Baudelaries continues to deteriorate to the point where the roles are now reversed, and the children are now having to use disguises to try and hide themselves from Olaf. And just when the situation seems the direst, it gets even worse. One of the Baudelaire parents may still be alive after the fire, but it is going to take all the children’s courage and daring to be able to escape from Olaf and figure out how to reunite with the survivor of the fire. The revelation that the answers Violet, Klaus, and Sunny desire about the mysterious V.F.D. are right under their noses proves not to be as big of a help to them as they thought especially when they learn that the fortune teller that will give them what they want is just as unscrupulous as Olaf himself. The plot had a good flow to it, and it kept the action moving along better than in some of the previous books. It seems strange to say that Snicket has finally found his stride, but as depressing as the stories seem to be getting, the more enjoyable they are to read. The Baudelaires lives are unlikely to get better any time soon, but maybe they will be able to find out something that will help them survive their continually worsening circumstances.

Other related materials: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 3) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 4) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Austere Academy (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 5) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 7) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Hostile Hospital (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 8) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Penultimate Peril (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 12) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 13) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Beatrice Letters by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Brett Helquist; Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Lemony Snicket; All The Wrong Questions series by Lemony Snicket; The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Caron Ellis, music by Nathaniel Stookey; The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart, illustrated by Carson Ellis

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The Hostile Hospital Review

ASOUE_8The Hostile Hospital (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 8) by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Bret Helquist

HarperCollins, 2001. 978-0064408660

Synopsis: Framed for a crime they didn’t commit, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire find themselves hiding out in the half-built Heimlich Hospital with the V.F.D. (Volunteers Fighting Disease). They have a stroke of luck when the three children volunteer to work in the Library of Records at the hospital, where they are able to uncover a shocking secret about the fire that killed their parents.

Why I picked it up: As I have said before, I apparently am enjoying these rather morbid adventures.

Why I finished it: Okay, so, things are starting to look truly dire for the Baudelaire orphans. They are on the run, wanted for murder, trying to hide from Count Olaf and Esmé, they are unable to get in touch with Mr. Poe, and they still have no hints about the meaning of V.F.D. The children seem to find a momentary solace in the Library of Records, which is of course ruined with the appearance of Esmé, whom it turns out is after the same mysterious Snicket file that could give the Baudelaries the answers to their many questions. More puzzle pieces click into place for both the characters and the reader, as we discover that Count Olaf is using anagrams in order to hide incriminating evidence and that the “V” in V.F.D. stands for “Volunteer”, per the few notes the orphans are able to decipher from the remains of the Quagmire’s notebooks. We still have yet to find out more about Beatrice, the missing sugar bowl, and the role Beatrice’s theft of the sugar bowl that lead to this series of unfortunate events. The timeline felt somewhat haphazard in this book, but I can’t put my finger on why exactly the timing of events is bothering me. Maybe it’s because there is less of the chase element between Olaf and the orphans, and now it has become a game of hide and seek. What fate holds for our heroes, I cannot say, but I have no doubt that they will be able to somehow survive these truly dire circumstances.

Other related materials: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 3) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 4) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Austere Academy (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 5) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 7) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 9) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Penultimate Peril (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 12) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 13) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Beatrice Letters by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Brett Helquist; Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Lemony Snicket; All The Wrong Questions series by Lemony Snicket; The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Caron Ellis, music by Nathaniel Stookey; The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart, illustrated by Carson Ellis

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The Vile Village Review

ASOUE_7The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 7) by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Bret Helquist

HarperCollins, 2001. 978-0064408653

Synopsis: With Mr. Poe running out of guardians, he decides to entrust the Baudelaire orphans to the V.F.D. (Village of Fowl Devotees) as part of the “It Takes a Village to Raise a Child” campaign. However, the village is not as keen to raise Violet, Klaus, and Sunny after they are accused of murdering Count Olaf (who is really Jacques Snicket) by the famous Detective Dupont (who is really Count Olaf in disguise). The children have also been finding mysterious couplets hinting that the Quagmire triplets are nearby, but with few clues to go on and the town coming after them, the orphans will have to work a miracle to find their friends and escape the village.

Why I picked it up: What’s the opposite of Schadenfreude?

Why I finished it: It becomes clear quickly that the V.F.D. has no real inkling of what the aphorism “It Takes a Village to Raise a Child” really means, making all the townspeople – with perhaps the exception of the caretaker Hector – seem brutish and impotent. Violet is quick to point out that having the village raise them does not entail that they do all of the townspeople’s chores, but this does little to deter the Council of Elders (a group of older citizens with crows decorating their hats) and make their situation any more tolerable. The villagers are also fans of the children being seen but not heard, which makes it difficult for the Baudelaires to prove they are innocent of murdering Jacques Snicket. The adults in the book are still predictably incompetent, but this again helps Violet, Klaus, and Sunny shine through with their wit and know-how. The Quagmire Triplets, although they do not make an appearance until the close of the book, are equally clever in their means of communicating their whereabouts to the Baudelaires. Snicket also takes a stab at slant journalism, though it doesn’t seem to add much depth to the story and merely serves to highlight the adult agenda. Fans of the series are sure to enjoy the continuation of this marvelously morbid series, though I am beginning to suspect that there is little hope the Baudelaire children will find any sort of respite.

Other related materials: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 3) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 4) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Austere Academy (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 5) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Hostile Hospital (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 8) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 9) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Penultimate Peril (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 12) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 13) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Beatrice Letters by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Brett Helquist; Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Lemony Snicket; All The Wrong Questions series by Lemony Snicket; The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Caron Ellis, music by Nathaniel Stookey; The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart, illustrated by Carson Ellis

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The Ersatz Elevator Review

ASOUE_6The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6) by Lemony Snicketl illustrations by Bret Helquist

HarperCollins, 2001. 978-0064408646

Synopsis: Being sent to live with Esmé Gigi Geniveve Squalor (the city’s sixth most important financial advisor) and her husband Jerome (who doesn’t like to argue) is a mixed bag for the Baudelaire orphans. On the one hand, they get to live in the penthouse of a 66-floor apartment building in one of the city’s most fashionable districts. On the other hand, Esmé and Jerome have only taken them in because adopting orphans is a trend and don’t seem to have their best interests at heart.

Why I picked it up: Like I said, I’ve become invested….

Why I finished it: Despite their experiences becoming gloomier and gloomier by the book, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny continue to remain resourceful and resilient in the face of adversity. Their dear friends the Quagmire Triplets have been kidnapped, Esmé is as vapid as Jerome is docile, and Count Olaf is continuing to cook up dastardly schemes to get his hands on their fortune. While I do have to agree with other reviewers that the book feels more like a commentary on the fallacy of fads and the obtuse nature of adults at the expense of the plot (although I would argue that the latter has been present throughout the series (see: Mr. Poe)), readers will still be able to connect with Snicket’s ability to turn clichés on their heads and the macabre humor. The events are simultaneously delighting and unsettling, and while there is perhaps no end in sight for the Baudelaries, they continue to inspire loyalty among fans of the series and capture the hearts of new readers.

Other related materials: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 3) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 4) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Austere Academy (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 5) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 7) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Hostile Hospital (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 8) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 9) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Penultimate Peril (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 12) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 13) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Beatrice Letters by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Brett Helquist; Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Lemony Snicket; All The Wrong Questions series by Lemony Snicket; The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Caron Ellis, music by Nathaniel Stookey; The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart, illustrated by Carson Ellis

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The Austere Academy Review

ASOUE_5The Austere Academy (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 5) by Lemony Snicket; Illustrations by Bret Helquist

HarperCollins, 2000. 978-0064408639

Synopsis: Unable to find another guardian, Mr. Poe sends Violet, Klaus, and Sunny to the dreary Prufrock Preparatory School. At the school, they encounter such unpleasantries as a vice principal who cannot play the violin (but insists upon doing so anyway), Carmelita Spats (who is a nasty, dirty, and unpleasant little girl), and a gym teacher with a turban who makes them run laps (who is really Count Olaf in disguise. But for all their misery, the Baudelaires finally have a stroke of luck when they meet the Quagmire Triplets and begin to unravel the mystery behind Count Olaf’s dastardly schemes.

Why I picked it up: I’ve become invested in learning about the fates of the Baudeleaires.

Why I finished it: I am noticing as the series goes on, Snicket is incorporating a rather lot of interesting vocabulary into the stories. It is not to say that I didn’t notice it before – knowing the meanings of long, complicated words is one of Klaus’s interests – but the vocabulary lesson seems to be building upon itself. I also had to have a bit of a laugh at some of the historical references: the Quagmire triplets are named for a famous Spanish actress (Isadora Duncan), the vice principal is named for a former Roman emperor (Nero), and Olaf’s chosen character is Ghengis (as in, Ghengis Khan, conqueror of Asia). Interesting for me as an older reader, and perhaps an astute reader who cares to look up some of the words and names. I am also perhaps disillusioned by the hope of new friends for the Baudelaires, whose friends’ parents and brother met a similar fate as the Baudelaire parents. And maybe I am a little too hopeful that the orphans will be able to uncover the origins of the secret organization of which Count Olaf is a member. And maybe I am a little too hopeful that they will be able to get away from him once and for all, but alas, there would not be more books in the series if that was indeed the case. For all I know, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny will continue to gather more questions than answers, but I also know that the siblings will manage to make it out of things alive and together.

Other related materials: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 3) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 4) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Ersatz Elevator (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 6) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Vile Village (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 7) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Hostile Hospital (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 8) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 9) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Penultimate Peril (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 12) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 13) by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Brett Helquist; The Beatrice Letters by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Brett Helquist; Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Lemony Snicket; All The Wrong Questions series by Lemony Snicket; The Composer is Dead by Lemony Snicket; illustrations by Caron Ellis, music by Nathaniel Stookey; The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart, illustrated by Carson Ellis

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What’s On: A Series of Unfortunate Events, Season 1

series-of-unfortunate-events-to-hit-netflix-462487A Series of Unfortunate Events, Season 1 starring Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Malina Weissman, Louis Hynes, Presley Smith, K. Todd Freeman, Usman Ally, Jacqueline Robbins, Joyce Robbins, Matty Cardaropole, and John DeSantis

Netflix, 2017.

Synopsis: After a fire kills their parents, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire are sent to live with their mysterious relative Count Olaf. The children soon learn that he is after their enormous fortune and will do anything to get his hands on it, leading the children on a series of harrowing adventures that will challenge them in ways they never thought possible.

Based on the book series by Lemony Snicket, the Netflix series could be considered a more concise follow-up to the 2004 film which was based on the first three books. Season One covers books 1-4, and each book is broken down into two episodes.  The two-episode format ensures that all the material from the books is included in the episode, and it feels much more concise than the film. The adaptation focuses more on the black humor element, making Lemony Snicket an actual character that narrates while navigating through the real-time events of the episodes. The range of the actors and the guest stars help to create the world of the books, and the actors themselves seem to have fun in their roles. A few elements have changed, but it helps to keep the viewer engaged and rounds out a few of the plot points from the books. The show plays up the V.F.D. as a secret society much more, creating characters that are operatives who are invested in helping the Baudelaires. It makes for an interesting bit of character development and creates a number of interesting plot devices as well. It’s definitely binge-worthy and fun for viewers of all ages.

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