Tag Archives: Colfer (author)

W.A.R.P.: The Forever Man Review

forever_manW.A.R.P., Book 3: The Forever Man by Eoin Colfer

Disney-Hyperion, 2015. 978-1484726037

Synopsis: Riley, an orphan boy living in Victorian London, has achieved his dream of becoming a renowned magician, the Great Savano. He owes much of his success to Chevie, a seventeen-year-old FBI agent who traveled from the future in a time pod and helped him defeat his murderous master, Albert Garrick. But it is difficult for Riley to enjoy his new life, for he has always believed that Garrick will someday, somehow, return to seek vengeance. Chevie has assured Riley that Garrick was sucked into a temporal wormhole, never to emerge. The full nature of the wormhole has never been understood, however, and just as a human body will reject an unsuitable transplant, the wormhole eventually spat him out. By the time Garrick makes it back to Victorian London, he has been planning his revenge on Riley for centuries. But even the best-laid plans can go awry, and when the three are tossed once more into the wormhole, they end up in a highly paranoid Puritan village where everything is turned upside down. Chevie is accused of being a witch, Garrick is lauded as the town’s protector, and . . . is that a talking dog? Riley will need to rely on his reserve of magic tricks to save Chevie and destroy his former master once and for all. – from Amazon.com

Why I picked it up: This series is filling the hole that Artemis Fowl left. Plus, I like the sci-fi/historical fiction mashup.

Why I finished it: This book starts off a little bit slower than the previous novel and seems to keep up the meandering pace throughout without ever really picking up speed. We’re getting much more into the science bit now that Garrick has been reintroduced and much like the characters, the reader is playing a guessing game about his powers and how the mutations created by the wormhole will affect Chevie, Riley, and the rest of the Puritan village in which they have been deposited. The plot centers around an ongoing game of cat-and-mouse between Riley and Garrick, which it should be noted started many years before while Riley was still under Garrick’s apprenticeship. It’s a cunning element to the plot, but unfortunately I wasn’t feeling much of the suspense I felt like I should be feeling. Riley has to get very creative knowing that his target is basically immortal and considers himself to have the upper hand. Yet, our heroes seem to have lost a little bit of their spark (along with a few other things) coming into this book and it doesn’t seem to get shaken off as the story moves along. I was anxious to see Riley succeed in killing Garrick once and for all, and I was hopeful that he and Chevie could make it out in one piece, but there wasn’t a hook for me to really drawn me in. The ending did manage to pick up a bit, but it was just a little bit too late.

Other related materials: The Reluctant Assassin (W.A.R.P., Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Hangman’s Revolution (W.A.R.P., Book 2) by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl series by Eoin Colfer; Lockwood & Co series by Jonathan Stroud; Seven Wonders books by Peter Lerangis; Keeper of the Lost Cities books by Shannon Messenger; The Lunar Chronicles books by Marissa Meyer; Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children books by Ransom Riggs;  A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle;  A Wind in the Door by Madeline L’Engle;  A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeline L’Engle; The CHRONOS Files books by Rysa Walker

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W.A.R.P.: The Hangman’s Revolution Review

hangmans_revolutionW.A.R.P., Book 2: The Hangman’s Revolution by Eoin Colfer

Disney-Hyperion, 2014. 978-1423161639

Synopsis: Chevron Savano thinks she’s going home to a familiar twentieth century, but when she arrives she finds that the world is a much different place from than what she remembers. In this reality, she is a cadet in a fascist training academy that prepares soldiers to fight in the war against France. Split between two minds and literally at war with herself, Chevie must find a way back to the nineteenth century in order to stop the revolution that creates her current world.

Why I picked it up: It was an impulse borrow at the library – I remembered having read and enjoyed the first book in the series, but had forgotten there was more.

Why I finished it: Having shifted over briefly from reading Colfer’s Artemis Fowl series, this book is much darker and more mysterious than the previous series. While there are parallels that can be drawn between Artemis and Holly and Riley and Chevie, W.A.R.P. is a series that grounds itself in a somewhat grimier waters and our heroes often find themselves in much more tenuous situations than their counterparts. Colfer takes care to remind the reader that London at the turn of the century is not wholly the thriving metropolis that it is made out to be: it has shady, unfriendly, disease-ridden parts that make the reader glad for modern medicine and indoor plumbing. This aside, Colfer blends the past with the present in such a way that the reader can be fully immersed in both worlds simultaneously. Chevie and Riley rely on their natural talents to get them out of tight situations – and they seem to get into quite a few of them. While the main premise of the book is laid out in the first few pages and we’re basically privy to the entire plot, Colfer still surprises the reader with his trademark twists that make us realize that perhaps we don’t know how the story will end. The book moves at a fast clip and there’s a lot of good action happening in every chapter that fuels the motivations of our protagonists and antagonists. It’s definitely more mature than Artemis Fowl and perhaps not for the faint of heart, but readers who dare are in for a fun but dangerous adventure through nineteenth century London and even beyond.

Other related materials: The Reluctant Assassin (W.A.R.P., Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Forever Man (W.A.R.P., Book 3) by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl series by Eoin Colfer; Lockwood & Co series by Jonathan Stroud; Seven Wonders books by Peter Lerangis; Keeper of the Lost Cities books by Shannon Messenger; The Lunar Chronicles books by Marissa Meyer; Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children books by Ransom Riggs;  A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle;  A Wind in the Door by Madeline L’Engle;  A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeline L’Engle; The CHRONOS Files books by Rysa Walker

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Artemis Fowl: The Time Paradox Review

artemis_fowl_6Artemis Fowl: The Time Paradox (Artemis Fowl, Book 6) by Eoin Colfer

Disney-Hyperion, 2009. 978-1423108375

Synopsis: When Artemis Fowl’s mother contracts a life-threatening illness, his world is turned upside down. The only hope for a cure lies in the brain fluid of the silky sifaka lemur. Unfortunately, the animal is extinct due to a heartless bargain Artemis himself made as a younger boy. Though the odds are stacked against him, Artemis is not willing to give up. With the help of his fairy friends, the young genius travels back in time to save the lemur and bring it back to the present. But to do so, Artemis will have to defeat a maniacal poacher, who has set his sights on new prey: Holly Short. The rules of time travel are far from simple, but to save his mother, Artemis will have to break them all and outsmart his most cunning adversary yet: Artemis Fowl, age ten. – from Amazon.com

Why I picked it up: I love reading about Artemis’s adventures.

Why I finished it: Time travel is tricky, something most of us are familiar with after many years of watching TV and reading other books that may have featured a time travel element. But in the world of Artemis Fowl, time travel seems almost more complicated than we were lead to believe. Sure, we knew that in the present it might only seem that we were gone a few seconds or even a few hours despite the fact that we could have been gone for days or years. We know we’re not supposed to interact with our past selves or really even manipulate anything lest we change the future to which we are returning. These are rules that Artemis is perfectly aware of, but since when has our anti-hero ever played by the rules? I appreciated that there were several nods back to the first book in the series throughout this installment and if you remember enough about the events of that first book, you can notice Colfer elegantly knotting some threads that we’d skipped over before. Things for the most part seem to come full circle for our protagonists – in this case, literally – but there were still a good number of twists and turns to keep me interested and guessing about what sort of set up was being created for the next book. Though, if the ending is any indication, things have been so completely skewed sideways that our heroes are going to need a lot more cunning in order to flip things around to the way they were. Artemis continues to become a softer person than when we are first introduced to him, a fact that does not go unnoticed by Artemis when he is confronted by his younger self. It’s almost become strange to ‘watch’ Artemis grow up – we understand the need of the character to grow both physically and emotionally, but we also still long for that largely unfeeling criminal mastermind that did what he had to do to get things done. Artemis still does what needs to be done, but there’s more emotion creeping in as we move forward, an element that could very well have a major impact. It’s a fast and engaging read that will leave you hanging and eager for more.

Other related materials: Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2) by Eoin Colfer; The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3) by Eoin Colfer; The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl, Book 4) by Eoin Colfer; The Lost Colony (Artemis Fowl, Book 5) by Eoin Colfer; The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl, Book 7) by Eoin Colfer; The Last Guardian (Artemis Fowl, Book 8) by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl: The Graphic Novel adapted by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin, art by Giovanni Rigano, colors by Paolo Lamanna; Artemis Fowl: The Seventh Dwarf by Eoin Colfer; W.A.R.P.  books by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud; H.I.V.E. series by Mark Walden; Inkheart by Cornelia Funke; Inkspell by Cornelia Funke; Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

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Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony Review

artemis_fowl_5Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony (Artemis Fowl, Book 5) by Eoin Colfer

Disney-Hyperion, 2009. 978-1423124948

Synopsis: The Fairies have a problem: creatures from another realm have been appearing above ground and causing a disturbance that could lead to the discovery of their race. The trouble is, they have no way of predicting these occurrences. Artemis Fowl, on the other hand, has the entire formula worked out – but so does someone else. And this someone else has been watching Artemis for a long time, working to stay one step ahead of the boy genius. Has Artemis met his match or will the secrets of the underground come to the real world?

Why I picked it up: I seem to be on an Eoin Colfer kick lately….

Why I finished it: This series is intriguing to me because it’s smart. Colfer assumes his reader is intelligent and so he’s not afraid to throw in some lessons here and there about art, science, and literature. This book in particular features quite a bit of science as it relates to time travel and physics – which is really pretty cool once you kind of get your head wrapped around it. It is also interesting to see Artemis sparring with someone who is his intellectual equal. It’s one thing to see him trade barbs with Holly, but it opens up a whole new world for our young anti-hero. The bit with the demons, which basically influences the entirety of the plot, doesn’t seem to be such a big deal until the latter half of the book. The science of the time travel and the worm hole that is pulling the demons into our world  is explained in simplistic terms, but I also felt that there was a large portion of the explanation for the shift that didn’t add up. On the other hand, the ending didn’t feel like it was rushed and it still gave our characters a chance to get their footing (for the most part) after the climax. And there’s definitely going to be some adjustment happening….  Fans of the series will eat this up just as fast as the others and be eagerly salivating for the next adventure – at least, I know I was!

Other related materials: Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2) by Eoin Colfer; The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3) by Eoin Colfer; The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl, Book 4) by Eoin Colfer; The Time Paradox (Artemis Fowl, Book 6) by Eoin Colfer; The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl, Book 7) by Eoin Colfer; The Last Guardian (Artemis Fowl, Book 8) by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl: The Graphic Novel adapted by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin, art by Giovanni Rigano, colors by Paolo Lamanna; Artemis Fowl: The Seventh Dwarf by Eoin Colfer; W.A.R.P.  books by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud; H.I.V.E. series by Mark Walden; Inkheart by Cornelia Funke; Inkspell by Cornelia Funke; Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

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Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception Review

artemis_fowl_4Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl, Book 4) by Eoin Colfer

Disney-Hyperion, 2009. 978-1423124559

Synopsis: Artemis Fowl is a teenage criminal mastermind that lives for the thrill of a heist, so much so that his latest mission to recover an oft-stolen art world treasure could be his greatest theft yet. But he also has memories floating just at the back of his mind that he can’t seem to place as his own; memories that have made him a target for revenge. And he’s going to have to remember if he wants to survive.

Why I picked it up: We know Artemis retained his memories from the mind wipe in the previous book, so I was curious to know how he engineered retrieving them.

Why I finished it: The notion that Artemis is struggling with two different parts of himself isn’t something that has been particularly prevalent in the first three books of the series. It’s not something we’re used to seeing in our favorite boy genius, but it’s also a reflection of the fact that Artemis (like the reader) is growing up. His life has changed drastically since the first book, and he still has to make a tough decision about whether to embrace the normal or continue to indulge his criminal enterprises. Most of us didn’t deal with those exact circumstances, but we do/did struggle with figuring out who we are and how we want to live our lives. Holly seems to be struggling in the same way: there’s a promotion waiting for her if she would take it, but it means that she gives up some of the thrill of being a field operative in favor of serving her people in a different capacity. Both seem to be at a crossroads that isn’t fully resolved by the end of the story, but it’s a series, so I have no doubt the journey will continue. The plot seems to hit the ground running this time around as well and keeps up a relatively steady pace until the end, keeping us turning the pages and on the edges of our seats. Fans of the series thus far won’t be disappointed and will be eager to read more.

Other related materials: Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2) by Eoin Colfer; The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3) by Eoin Colfer; The Lost Colony (Artemis Fowl, Book 5) by Eoin Colfer; The Time Paradox (Artemis Fowl, Book 6) by Eoin Colfer; The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl, Book 7) by Eoin Colfer; The Last Guardian (Artemis Fowl, Book 8) by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl: The Graphic Novel adapted by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin, art by Giovanni Rigano, colors by Paolo Lamanna; Artemis Fowl: The Seventh Dwarf by Eoin Colfer; W.A.R.P.  books by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud; H.I.V.E. series by Mark Walden; Inkheart by Cornelia Funke; Inkspell by Cornelia Funke; Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

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Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code Review

artemis_fowl_3Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3) by Eoin Colfer

Disney-Hyperion, 2003. 978-0786819140

Synopsis: Now that his father is back from exile, he has told Artemis that he wants to focus more on legitimate business ventures rather than the underhanded schemes that have made the Fowl name famous. But Artemis has different ideas: he’s planned one last score before he goes straight, a scheme that lands him in hot water and puts Butler in danger. Will Artemis take the chance to be the hero that his father had challenged him to be or will he fall back on deviousness to come out on top?

Why I picked it up: I saw it at the library and remembered that I never got around to finishing the series.

Why I finished it: Artemis may have grown some over the course of these three books, but at his heart he’s still the young, conniving genius that we came to know and love in the first book. Though he is now thirteen and has been made to return to boarding school, it still hasn’t stopped him from planning and (somewhat) successfully executing his (supposedly) last job. And it would seem that Artemis has come to the end of the line, what with his bodyguard being fatally injured and the fairy people (politely) forcing a mind wipe of himself and his personal protection team after he loses and recovers a supercomputer built from stolen fairy technology. But we all know that Artemis isn’t done – I mean, there are other books, after all; we know that our favorite anti-hero has a few tricks up his sleeve that will enable him to continue doing what it is that he does best. What I liked about this volume is that it hits the ground running and doesn’t stop, giving it the feel of a spy thriller rather than a middle grade novel. Newcomers to the series will appreciate the accelerated pace after the more moderated pace of the first two books. The end is ultimately satisfying, but leaves an air of mystery about it. We know Artemis isn’t done, but what remains to be seen is what he will do with the (fairy-free) time that is given to him.

Other related materials: Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2) by Eoin Colfer; The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl, Book 4) by Eoin Colfer; The Lost Colony (Artemis Fowl, Book 5) by Eoin Colfer; The Time Paradox (Artemis Fowl, Book 6) by Eoin Colfer; The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl, Book 7) by Eoin Colfer; The Last Guardian (Artemis Fowl, Book 8) by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl: The Graphic Novel adapted by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin, art by Giovanni Rigano, colors by Paolo Lamanna; Artemis Fowl: The Seventh Dwarf by Eoin Colfer; W.A.R.P.  books by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud; H.I.V.E. series by Mark Walden; Inkheart by Cornelia Funke; Inkspell by Cornelia Funke; Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

 

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Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident Review

artemis_fowl_2Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident (Artemis Fowl, Book 2) by Eoin Colfer

Deckle Edge, 2002. 978-0786808557

Synopsis: Artemis is at boarding school in Ireland when he suddenly receives an urgent video e-mail from Russia. In it is a plea from his father, who has been kidnapped by the Russian Mafiya. As Artemis rushes to his rescue, he is stopped by Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon fairy police. But this time, instead of battling the fairies, he is going to have to join forces with them if he wants to save one of the few people in the world he loves. – from Amazon.com

Why I picked it up: I appear to be in an anti-hero sort of mood.

Why I finished it: Artemis has had to become a little bit more underhanded with his scheming now that he is under supervision and away from Fowl Manor, and the reader will notice that he’s developed a somewhat more humanistic side that doesn’t seem terribly like him. It’s sort of unnerving to see him with the more traditional hero tendencies, but thankfully, he doesn’t tend to dwell on them for very long. The reader is introduced (briefly) to Artemis Senior and the fairy Opal Koibi (remember her – she’ll be important later), who join our cast of unlikely acquaintances. Let’s not go so far as to call the group friendly, but by the end of the book, we do see some elements of respect developing. This book starts off a little slower than its predecessor, but after the first chapter things heat up quickly and the rest of the plot is comparatively fast-paced. Between orchestrating a rescue operation and squashing a rebellion, our crew certainly has their hands full, but Colfer manages to keep both stories from getting too jumbled. The reader is kept on the edge of their seat up until the final pages, when a new ‘problem’ seems to emerge and set the stage for Artemis’s next venture. It’s sure to thrill fans of the first book and engage readers who are new to the series.

Other related materials: Artemis Fowl (Artemis Fowl, Book 1) by Eoin Colfer; The Eternity Code (Artemis Fowl, Book 3) by Eoin Colfer; The Opal Deception (Artemis Fowl, Book 4) by Eoin Colfer; The Lost Colony (Artemis Fowl, Book 5) by Eoin Colfer; The Time Paradox (Artemis Fowl, Book 6) by Eoin Colfer; The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl, Book 7) by Eoin Colfer; The Last Guardian (Artemis Fowl, Book 8) by Eoin Colfer; Artemis Fowl: The Graphic Novel adapted by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin, art by Giovanni Rigano, colors by Paolo Lamanna; Artemis Fowl: The Seventh Dwarf by Eoin Colfer; W.A.R.P. books by Eoin Colfer; The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer; The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud; H.I.V.E. series by Mark Walden; Inkheart by Cornelia Funke; Inkspell by Cornelia Funke; Inkdeath by Cornelia Funke

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