Tag Archives: owly (series)

Owly, Vol. 2: Just A Little Blue Review

owly_2Owly, Vol. 2: Just A Little Blue by Andy Runton

Top Shelf Productions, 2005. 978-1891830648

Synopsis: Best friends Owly and Wormy meet a bluebird who nests with its family in a rotting tree while out gathering apples. When the pair learn that the bluebird’s home is in danger, they decide to build their neighbor a new home. Blue thinks the new house is a trap and threatens Owly and Wormy. Discouraged, the friends pack away the little house in a closet. Months later, when a fierce storm threatens the bluebird’s tree, Owly and Wormy come to their rescue.

Why I picked it up: I read the series for a reader’s advisory class in library school and this wordless comic series has become one of my absolute favorites.

Why I finished it: Owly is a kind but somewhat shy owl always looking for new friends and adventures, much like many of the readers. Even though the characters are animals, Runton humanizes them, giving the story a sort of sweetness and simplicity. The little quirks they demonstrate are really what endears them to the readers. Owly and Wormy display an optimism throughout the story that helps them continue to move forward despite Blue being mean and rejecting their house; plus, I loved that Owly serves tea when they go home to help cheer Wormy up. They show us that it is okay to be saddened by setbacks, but that we all have the power to move on to something even better. It was heartbreaking to see the pair sacrifice their beloved wheelbarrow to build the birdhouse, but it teaches us that there are both easier and hard sacrifices to be made for the sake of friendship. It demonstrates the value of being a good neighbor and caring for the ‘person’ rather than the place. Runton’s art has as much personality as his characters, using curves to create softened edges and an upbeat feeling even when things are sad. It’s a fun, fast read for persons of any age and reading level that shows us the kindness is a universal language.

Other related materials: Owly, Vol. 1: The Way Home & The Bittersweet Summer by Andy Runton; Owly, Vol. 3: Flying Lessons by Andy Runton; Owly, Vol. 4: A Time to be Brave by Andy Runton; Owly, Vol. 5: Tiny Tales by Andy Runton; Owly & Wormy: Bright Lights and Starry Nights! by Andy Runton; Owly & Wormy: Friends All Aflutter! by Andy Runton; Bone comics by Jeff Smith; Little Robot by Ben Hatke; Korgi series by Christian Slade; Hildafolk books by Luke Pearson; Stinky: A Toon Book  by Eleanor Davis

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Owly review

Owly, Vol. 1: The Way Home & The Bittersweet Summer by Andy Runton

Top Shelf Productions, 2004. 978-1891830624

Synopsis: Owly is a loveable but lonely owl who spends his days watching and feeding birds in the park. On the way home from the park, Owly rescues a worm from a rainstorm and helps him recover. Can Owly help Wormy find his way home?

Why I picked it up: It was required reading for my graphic novels class, but the premise of the story (an owl looking to make friends) made me want to read more than one.

Why I finished it: This story is painfully adorable! Runton creates for the reader a mostly wordless comic in which the characters communicate largely through the use of symbols like “!!!” and “?”. Owly’s story is sweet and is relatable to readers of any age, and the friendships Owly develops in the course of the short novel help show the meaning of friendship and the power of helping other people. The illustrations are equally enchanting and draw the reader into the story – one of my favorite sequences is a photo album showing how Owly spends the summer with Wormy. Like the story, Runton’s pictures are simple, sweet, and engaging; recommended reading for all ages.

Other related materials: Owly, Vol. 2: Just a Little Blue by Andy Runton; Owly, Vol. 3: Flying Lessons by Andy Runton; Owly, Vol. 4: A Time to be Brave by Andy Runton; Owly, Vol. 5: Tiny Tales by Andy Runton; Owly & Wormy, Friends All Aflutter! by Andy Runton; Bone, Vol. 1: Out From Boneville by Jeff Smith; Lunch Lady books by Jarrett J. Krosoczka; Copper by Kazu Kibuishi; Amulet series by Kazu Kibuishi; Smile by Raina Telgemeier; Knights of the Lunch Table books by Frank Cammuso; Babymouse books by Jennifer L. Holm

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