Tag Archives: Max the Flying Sausage Dog (series)

Max the Flying Sausage Dog: The Seaside Tail Colouring Book Review

max_the_flying_sausage_dog_seaside_tailMax the Flying Sausage Dog: The Seaside Tail Colouring Book by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley; illustrated by Arthur Robins

Words in the Works LLC, 2017. 978-0997228458

Synopsis: When Tom’s cousin Katie comes to visit, the family takes a trip to the seaside to enjoy the waves. But what happens when a wave sweeps Katie out to sea? Will Tom use Max’s special power to help save his cousin?

Why I picked it up: It’s the perfect end of summer read! Plus, it’s also a coloring book!

Why I finished it: If you have read some of my other posts, you will know how much I have been enjoying Tom and Max’s adventures. And now, with this coloring book, the reader can take a role in the story by playing illustrator! I loved being able put down my own version of Robins’ wonderful illustrations and putting a different spin on this story that was all my own. The story itself is not as long as the other three Max books, but there’s lots of blank pages that invite the reader to fill it up with their own drawings and doodles. Plus, there are pages from the previous stories for the reader to color as well! This may be a quick read, but it will provide hours of entertainment.

Other related materials: Max the Flying Sausage Dog: A Tail from London by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley, illustrated by Arthur Robins; Max the Flying Sausage Dog: Tails from the Pound by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley, illustrated by Arthur Robins; Max the Flying Sausage Dog: A Scary Tail (Bullies, watch out!) by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley, illustrated by Arthur Robins; Gumwrappers and Goggles written and illustrated by Winifred Barnum-Newman; That Day in September and Other Rhymes for the Times by Liz Lime; Flat Stanley books by Jeff Brown, illustrated by Macky Pamintuan; Nate the Great books by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, illustrated by Marc Simont; Roscoe Riley Rules books by Katherine Applegate, illustrated by Brian Biggs; George Brown, Class Clown books by Nancy Krulik, illustrated by Aaron Blecha; The Notebook of Doom books by Troy Cummings

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Max the Flying Sausage Dog: A Scary Tail Review

max_the_flying_sausage_dog_3Max the Flying Sausage Dog: A Scary Tail (Bullies, watch out!) by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley; illustrated by Arthur Robins

Words in the Works, 2016. 978-0997228427

Synopsis: Tom and Max are always picked on by the bullies next door and their bigger, meaner dogs. Could a neighbor in a run-down house have the answer Tom needs to get the bullies to be nicer?

Why I picked it up: This series is so cute and fun!

Why I finished it: This might not be a Halloween story, per se, but it has ghouls, ghosts, and witches that will thrill each reader. When Tom’s parents convince him to go and help out an older lady everyone thinks is a witch, he and Max are nervous about what will happen to them. But there’s no need to worry because Miss Amersham isn’t actually a witch – she’s just lonely since her dog died, and Tom knows what it’s like to lose a friend. Miss Amersham tells Tom he needs to confront the bullies (whatever that means) and then they will stop picking on him. While the solution isn’t immediately apparent to Tom or the reader, the solution is both creative and clever. What is so enchanting to me about this series is that it hits on a lot of different themes, like responsibility and bullying, that are things most of us have to deal with all the time either directly or indirectly. We might be afraid to go to that scary house down the street and interact with a weird neighbor, but it’s still someone’s home and that neighbor is still a person that needs to be treated with respect. We shouldn’t make fun of something or someone just because we perceive it as different or weird. We need to celebrate our individuality and be willing to do things that might seem a little bit scary at first. But these experiences are the ones in which we grow the most. Sweet, charming, and full of love, this book can be enjoyed by all ages and all reading levels either read to yourself or out loud. I’m always excited to read more about Max and Tom’s adventures!

Other related materials: Max the Flying Sausage Dog: A Tail from London by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley, illustrated by Arthur Robins; Max the Flying Sausage Dog: Tails from the Pound by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley, illustrated by Arthur Robins Gumwrappers and Goggles written and illustrated by Winifred Barnum-Newman; That Day in September and Other Rhymes for the Times by Liz Lime; Flat Stanley books by Jeff Brown, illustrated by Macky Pamintuan; Nate the Great books by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, illustrated by Marc Simont; Roscoe Riley Rules books by Katherine Applegate, illustrated by Brian Biggs; George Brown, Class Clown books by Nancy Krulik, illustrated by Aaron Blecha; The Notebook of Doom books by Troy Cummings

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Max the Flying Sausage Dog: Tails from the Pound Review

max_the_flying_sausage_dog_2Max the Flying Sausage Dog: Tails from the Pound by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley; illustrated by Arthur Robins

Words in the Works, LLC, 2015. 978-0991036486

Synopsis: When Max is taken back to the pound by the pound owner and a ‘policeman’, Tom and his mom must hatch a plan to outwit the bad guys and get back their beloved pet.

Why I picked it up: I really enjoyed the first book and I was eager to read about more of Max and Tom’s adventures.

Why I finished it: This story starts out tense because we don’t know why Max was taken or if Tom will be able to get him back. But when Tom dreams up a scheme involving the Queen of England, our hopes rise along with Tom, and we feel confident that the story will have a happy ending. Since the book was originally published in the United Kingdom, there is a helpful glossary at the start of the book to aid American readers with some of the British jargon used by the characters. Robins’ art is fun and playful, matching the whimsy of the story. The reader is drawn into the pages of the book, and we experience all of Tom’s highs and lows. It’s a touching story that will appeal to pet owners and non-pet owners alike, and a great short chapter book for transitioning readers.

Other related materials: Max the Flying Sausage Dog: A Tail from London by John O’Driscoll and Richard Kelley, illustrated by Arthur Robins; Gumwrappers and Goggles written and illustrated by Winifred Barnum-Newman; That Day in September and Other Rhymes for the Times by Liz Lime; Flat Stanley books by Jeff Brown, illustrated by Macky Pamintuan; Nate the Great books by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, illustrated by Marc Simont; Roscoe Riley Rules books by Katherine Applegate, illustrated by Brian Biggs; George Brown, Class Clown books by Nancy Krulik, illustrated by Aaron Blecha; The Notebook of Doom books by Troy Cummings

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